10 Reasons Why You Should March For Science (Synopsis) [Starts With A Bang]

“We’ve arranged a international civilization in which most crucial elements profoundly depend on science and technologies. We have also arranged things so that practically no a single understands science and technologies. This is a prescription for disaster. We may get away with it for a whilst, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and energy is going to blow up in our faces.” -Carl Sagan

On Saturday, April 22nd, scientists, science teachers, science enthusiasts and science fans will all come together for a selection of causes, all more than the world, to March for Science. Although there are undeniably several with extremely powerful political opinions, the march itself is not political, but is rather a celebration of science and all it does for the planet.

Closed-loop therapies which continuously monitor, record and display neuronal activity alongside neural stimulation are remarkable tools for helping those with PTSD and related traumas. This image is a map from part of DARPA’s Systems-Based Neurotechnology for Emerging Therapies (SUBNETS) program. Image credit: Massachusetts General Hospital and Draper Labs.

Closed-loop therapies which constantly monitor, record and display neuronal activity alongside neural stimulation are outstanding tools for helping these with PTSD and associated traumas. This image is a map from element of DARPA’s Systems-Based Neurotechnology for Emerging Therapies (SUBNETS) system. Image credit: Massachusetts Basic Hospital and Draper Labs.

The way to keep moving the globe forward in the greatest way achievable is strongly rooted in science and scientific investigation, and its greatest enemy is dogmatic, biased argumentation and reasoning. We live in a globe that is extraordinarily dependent on science and technology, and that is why valuing our investments in it and the benefits of our investigations are more important than ever.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite senses temperature using infrared wavelengths. This image shows temperature of the Earth’s surface or clouds covering it for the month of April 2003. The scale ranges from -81 degrees Celsius (-114° Fahrenheit) in black/blue to 47° C (116° F) in red. Higher latitudes are increasingly obscured by clouds, though some features like the Great Lakes are apparent. Northernmost Europe and Eurasia are completely obscured by clouds, while Antarctica stands out cold and clear at the bottom of the image. Image credit: NASA AIRS.

The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite senses temperature employing infrared wavelengths. This image shows temperature of the Earth’s surface or clouds covering it for the month of April 2003. The scale ranges from -81 degrees Celsius (-114° Fahrenheit) in black/blue to 47° C (116° F) in red. Larger latitudes are increasingly obscured by clouds, though some attributes like the Fantastic Lakes are apparent. Northernmost Europe and Eurasia are completely obscured by clouds, even though Antarctica stands out cold and clear at the bottom of the image. Image credit: NASA AIRS.

Come learn 10 beneficial motives to March for Science, and I hope you come to one this Saturday!

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