Science

Three Storm Chasers Die in Crash in Texas

By CHRISTOPHER MELE March 29, 2017 For these who chase serious storms the thrill of the chase is tempered by danger. The effects of a tornado — damaging hail, winds that can exceed one hundred miles per hour and debris that can be produced into deadly projectiles — are hazardous, but the other perils are man-produced: the automobiles driven by other storm ...

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The quackery that is “battlefield acupuncture” continues to metastasize [Respectful Insolence]

Right after yesterday’s post on a regional news station’s credulous promotion of quack acupuncture (but I repeat myself) for pets, I thought I’d remain on the subject of acupuncture for one far more day. The explanation is that a reader sent me a link to an article in Stars and Stripes that genuinely irritated me, Acupuncture becomes common as battlefield ...

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Trump Signs Executive Order Unwinding Obama Climate Policies

By CORAL DAVENPORT and ALISSA J. RUBIN March 28, 2017 WASHINGTON — President Trump, flanked by firm executives and miners, signed a extended-promised executive order on Tuesday to nullify President Barack Obama’s climate modify efforts and revive the coal business, efficiently ceding American leadership in the international campaign to curb the dangerous heating of the planet. Mr. Trump made clear that the United States had ...

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Why fossil fuel corporations killed us [Greg Laden's Blog]

Often, when I appear at the things the Republicans and their leader, Donald Trump, are performing, I believe of that poignant line in so a lot of actual and fictional moments: “You have killed me.” A person says that due to the fact the killing is carried out, but they are not but dead. The knife is driven deep, the ...

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Planned Rollback of Climate Rules Unlikely to Achieve All Trump’s Goals

News Evaluation By CORAL DAVENPORT March 27, 2017 President Trump is expected to sign an executive order on Tuesday to roll back most of President Barack Obama’s climate adjust legacy, celebrating the move as a way to enhance the nation’s “energy independence” and to restore thousands of lost coal mining jobs. But power economists say the expected order falls brief of both ...

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Hope Springs Early, but Not Eternal, for the Deadnettle — or for Us

By A. HOPE JAHREN March 27, 2017 The deadnettle is the Punxsutawney Phil of the plant world: quick of stature but stout of heart. At the first hint of winter’s wane, its stem rises from the ground and a green, grasping hand of sepals unclenches to divulge two silky-white petals, a single of which unfurls straight up toward the sky. These petals frame ...

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Dr. Lewis Rowland, Leading Neurologist on Nerve and Muscle Diseases, Dies at 91

By DENISE GRADY March 23, 2017 Dr. Lewis P. Rowland, a neurologist who created basic discoveries in nerve and muscle diseases and clashed with government investigators during the McCarthy era, died on March 16 in Manhattan. He was 91. The lead to was a stroke, his son Steven mentioned. Dr. Rowland, the chairman of Columbia University’s neurology division for 25 years, died ...

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Bao Bao, an American-Born Panda, Steps Out in China

By KAROLINE KAN March 24, 2017 CHENGDU, China — Strange food. Unintelligible natives. These are just some of the issues that Bao Bao, the three-year-old panda from the National Zoo in Washington, has grappled with because moving to China final month. But the culture shock is fading, her handlers say, as she settles into the land of her ancestors. On Friday, after ...

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What do frogs and humans have in common? [Life Lines]

Image of Rana dybowski by Pierre Fidenci, by means of Wikimedia Commons Leptin is a hormone that signals the brain to suppress appetite in humans. While researchers at the University of Michigan described a similar appetite regulating role for leptin in South African clawed frogs (Xenopus), they also discovered that leptin signals limb development in tadpoles. They suspect that this takes place as ...

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