Science

F.D.A. Will Allow 23andMe to Sell Genetic Tests for Disease Risk to Consumers

By GINA KOLATA April 6, 2017 For the initial time, the Meals and Drug Administration stated it would enable a company to sell genetic tests for disease danger straight to buyers, offering men and women with information about the likelihood that they could develop various circumstances, like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The move on Thursday is a turnaround for the agency, which had ...

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Mud Erased a Village in Peru, a Sign of Larger Perils in South America

By NICHOLAS CASEY and ANDREA ZARATE April 6, 2017 BARBA BLANCA, Peru — A sheet of mud covers the village. Lampposts are bent sideways. Rooftops sit blocks from their residences. The nave of the village church is filled with sludge. A catastrophic mudslide basically erased Barba Blanca from the map final month. But somehow all 150 individuals who lived right here in this Peruvian ...

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Trump Signs Most Hated Bill Ever In Secret [Greg Laden's Blog]

This bill was so unpopular that only 11% of Americans believed he should sign it. It was so unpopular that 74% of Americans thought he should veto it. This bill was not one particular of Trump’s campaign promises, and it wasn’t element of the Republican Celebration platform. I can only assume it was a purchased and paid for deal. I’m ...

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Antarctic Ice Reveals Earth’s Accelerating Plant Growth

April 5, 2017 Carl Zimmer For decades, scientists have been attempting to figure out what all the carbon dioxide we’ve been placing into the atmosphere has been carrying out to plants. It turns out that the best place to uncover an answer is where no plants can survive: the icy wastes of Antarctica. As ice forms in Antarctica, it traps ...

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Why You Shouldn’t Walk on Escalators

By CHRISTOPHER MELE April four, 2017 The train pulls into Pennsylvania Station throughout the morning rush, the doors open and you make a beeline for the escalators. You stick to the left and walk up the stairs, figuring you can save valuable seconds and get a bit of exercising. But the professionals are united in this: You are performing it incorrect, seizing ...

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Saturn’s Moon, Enceladus, Is Our Closest Great Hope For Life Beyond Earth (Synopsis) [Starts With A Bang]

“Aha! That satellite was scuttled on Enceladus, Saturn’s primary dump moon!” -Professor Farnsworth, Futurama When you consider about life beyond Earth, you probably think of it occurring on a somewhat Earth-like planet. A rocky world, with either a previous or present liquid ocean atop the surface, appears perfect. But that may possibly not even be exactly where life on Earth originated! ...

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One in 10 Pregnant Women With Zika in U.S. Have Babies With Birth Defects

By PAM BELLUCK April four, 2017 One in ten pregnant ladies in the continental United States with a confirmed Zika infection had a baby with brain damage or other critical birth defects, according to the most comprehensive report to date on American pregnancies during the Zika crisis. The report, published Tuesday by the Centers for Disease Handle and Prevention, also offered more ...

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Plan to Cut Funding for Biomedical Research Hits Opposition in Congress

By ROBERT PEAR April three, 2017 WASHINGTON — A proposal by President Trump to cut federal spending for biomedical study by 18 % — just months right after Congress authorized bipartisan legislation to enhance such spending — has run into a buzz saw on Capitol Hill, with Republicans and Democrats calling it misguided. “I’m incredibly concerned about the prospective impact of the ...

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Playing politics with women’s health [The Pump Handle]

In the 18 days between Residence Republicans’ introduction of the American Health Care Act and its withdrawal, women’s well being was in the spotlight. With Home Speaker Paul Ryan now stating that he’s going to attempt again on legislation to “replace” the Cost-effective Care Act, it is worth looking at some of the methods the ACA has benefited women – ...

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Alexei Abrikosov, Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dies at 88

By KENNETH CHANG April 2, 2017 Alexei Abrikosov, who shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2003 for critical insights into how specific supplies conduct electrical energy with no resistance, died on Wednesday at his home in Sunnyvale, Calif. He was 88. His death was announced by Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois, where he had worked as a scientist. His son-in-law, Gary ...

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