How would the Universe change if we grew an extra dimension? (Synopsis) [Starts With A Bang]

“There is a fifth dimension, beyond that which is known to man. It is a dimension as vast as space and as timeless as infinity. It is the middle ground amongst light and shadow, among science and superstition.” -Rod Serling

If we take a appear at a two-dimensional surface, it is fairly apparent that we’re fairly omnipotent in comparison. We can draw or erase anything in that dimension, add or eliminate objects, rearrange their internal structures with no leaving them any defense, etc. All of that may well lead you to wonder no matter whether there’s the possibility of a fourth spatial dimension out there, and regardless of whether that could be part of our Universe?

The four-dimensional analogue of a 3D cube is an 8-cell (left) the 24-cell (right) has no 3D analogue. Extra dimensions bring with them extra possibilities. Image credit: Jason Hise with Maya and Macromedia Fireworks.

The 4-dimensional analogue of a 3D cube is an eight-cell (left) the 24-cell (right) has no 3D analogue. Extra dimensions bring with them extra possibilities. Image credit: Jason Hise with Maya and Macromedia Fireworks.

Geometrically, it’s certainly feasible. From a historical point of view, there’s no explanation a dimension needs to remain the exact same size over time, either. In 1980, Alan Chodos and Steve Detweiler showed that a Universe that started with four spatial dimensions could have effortlessly evolved into a Universe quite much like the one we see today. Creating on that, it would be attainable for a extremely small added dimension to develop massive over time. If it did, the consequences would be devastating, but fascinating.

A computer-generated rendering of a rubble-pile asteroid and a debris field of surrounding rubble. Based on a 3-D model of asteroid Itokawa by Doug Ellison, and with data from NASA-JPL. Image credit: Kevin Gill/flickr.

A pc-generated rendering of a rubble-pile asteroid and a debris field of surrounding rubble. Primarily based on a 3-D model of asteroid Itokawa by Doug Ellison, and with data from NASA-JPL. Image credit: Kevin Gill/flickr.

Come discover out the full story of what it would imply if the Universe grew an added dimension!

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